Rangely, ME

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Rangely was a stop we hadn’t intended to take. We were well on our way to making our goal mileage for the night, when it decided to downpour for about 3 hours. We’ve recently been leap-frogging a lot with a guy named Hooker, but we lost him today when he stopped to take shelter under the tarp of a summer camp group when it started to rain hard. Continue reading

Mt. Greylock

Mt Greylock tower

The breezy weather was continuing so we enjoyed our hike out of Dalton, and through the town of Cheshire, MA, where the trail passed right next to a small hot dog and ice cream shop. Hot dogs and ice cream! What hiker can resist those things? Not these two. We have both been craving milk shakes for quite some time now. Continue reading

Thunderstorms and Kind Strangers to the Rescue

Stormy skies above Palmerton

We got a much later start on the trail than we intended to, and then decided to take long lunch break in a sunny spot to let our shoes and socks dry from yesterday’s soaking. It was quite nice to have much drier feet after lunch and we were glad to have a chance to just sit and talk for a while. Continue reading

501 Shelter

henry knauber

We cut our day a little short because we reached the 501 shelter just as it started to rain. It turned out that this particular shelter was a great place to be in bad weather. Unlike most shelters on the AT, which are three walled lean-to’s, this one had four walls, a roof with a skylight, and two shelter cats to keep the mice at bay. Continue reading

Shenandoah National Park, Bears, Slackpacking, and Good Friends

View in the Shenandoahs

We saw our first bear! We were hiking quickly to get to our campground for the evening because a thundercloud was rolling in, when we startled a bear cub that was sitting next to the trail. It took off too fast for us to get a picture, but with no mama bear in sight we decided it was best to get moving. So we spent the next ten minutes or so walking as fast as we could up an incline while talking loudly. Nothing bothered us, so I suppose our shortness of breath was worth it. Continue reading